History of South Africa Jewellery Ring

R 1,640.00 | 32,800 StyleMiles

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92.5 Sterling Silver
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History of South Africa Jewellery Ring. Hand and crafted in Solid Sterling Silver with an Oxidised finished. 24gms

Style

Oxidised Finish, Sterling Silver

Size

14 mm, 14.4 mm, 14.8 mm, 15.2 mm, 15.6 mm, 16 mm, 16.45 mm, 16.9 mm, 17.3 mm, 17.7 mm, 18.2 mm, 18.6 mm, 19 mm, 19.4 mm, 19.8 mm, 20.2 mm, 20.6 mm, 21 mm, 21.4 mm, 21.8 mm, 22.2 mm, 22.6 mm

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History of South Africa Jewellery at a glance...

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“South Africa is a land rich in natural treasures and majestic landscapes where many different cultures co-exist, earning its people the affectionate nickname of ‘The Rainbow nation”.

The symbols depicted on the Solid Sterling Silver jewellery were carefully selected and the meaning, significance and history of each one can be further explored in the accompanying booklet.

“Ubuntu”, an African term meaning human kindness, is adopted by South Africa and its passionate people; through caring for others we can live in a world defined not by our differences, but by our common hopes.
Our heritage jewellery is symbolic of this precious common hope and dream.

It is with great pride that this unique range has been created and hand crafted in Cape Town, commemorating South Africa and her journey thus far.

Khoi-San-PeopleKhoisan People

The earliest humans evolved on the Central African plains, hunting and gathering food, using tools chippedfrom stone. Millennia later some of their descendants moved southward to become the San people, nomads who hunted, fished and lived in small, loose groups. Their rock art adorns caves all over South Africa. Later the Khoikhoi arrived, a more homogenous group of pastoralists who kept cattle and sheep, and settled in the Eastern and Western Cape.

These two groups interacted, intermarried and are often referred to as the Khoisan. About 1,500 years ago the first wave of Nguni farmers came from West and Central Africa, bringing with them millet, sorgum, sheep , cattle and thier skills in working metal. These migrants became the Zulu and Xhosa nations. They settled along the Southern coastal belt, where they also intermingled with the Khoisan. These were the main groups in south-eastern Africa when the Dutch arrived at the Cape in 1652Jan-Van-RiebeeckJan Van Riebeeck

In the 17th century the Dutch East India Company established the first European settlement in the Cape, as a half-way station for provisions and maintenance for its merchant sailing ships making long and perilous trips to the East.

On 6th April 1652 Jan van Riebeeck arrived as its Commander, and his three ships, the Dromedaris, Reiger and Goede Hoop, carried personnel and supplies for this desolate outpost.

He became regarded as the founding father of the Afrikaner people and his image appeared on South African stamps and currency until the advent of a democratic state in 1994.

1820-Settlers1820 Settlers

In 1806 the Cape again became a British Colony. The Industrial Revolution in England created vast social and economic problems and many sought to emigrate. The British government agreed to assist groups of prospective agriculturalists to emigrate to the Cape, ostensibly to provide opportunities for them to become successful farmers. However the government’s sole motive was military, and without any adequate preparations settlers were placed in the harsh and inhospitable terrain of the Eastern Cape to ‘Take root or die’.

They were drawn into the government’s attempts to secure the Eastern frontier, by then home to the Xhosa people. Many years of hardship and involvement in Frontier Wars ensued, but the influence of these British Settlers on the subsequent history of South Africa has been immense.

The Albany District, with evocative villages and the city of Grahamstown, remains the focus of English culture and a major educational centre.

The-Voortrekkers

The Voortrekkers

The Voortrekkers (trail blazers) were early frontier farmers of Dutch and French origin who left the boundaries of the Cape Colony, trekking out on epic journeys into the inlands of South Africa.

During the 1830s some 14,000 hardy and independent pioneers set out in their iconic mode of travel, their ox wagons, to escape conflict with the Xhosa and the irksome regulations of the British government at the Cape, particularly in the light of the ’emancipation of Slaves’ in 1838.

Their leaders such as Piet Retief, Louis Trichardt, Andries Pretorius and Pieter Uys are Afrikaner heroes, and this exodus, known as the Great Trek, is seen as a defining point in Afrikaner character and history.

The-Anglo-Zulu-War

The Anglo-Zulu War

The Voortrekkers (trail blazers) were early frontier farmers of Dutch and French origin who left the boundaries of the Cape Colony, trekking out on epic journeys into the inlands of South Africa.

During the 1830s some 14,000 hardy and independent pioneers set out in their iconic mode of travel, their ox wagons, to escape conflict with the Xhosa and the irksome regulations of the British government at the Cape, particularly in the light of the ’emancipation of Slaves’ in 1838.

Their leaders such as Piet Retief, Louis Trichardt, Andries Pretorius and Pieter Uys are Afrikaner heroes, and this exodus, known as the Great Trek, is seen as a defining point in Afrikaner character and history.

The-Anglo-Boer-War

The Anglo-Boer War

In 1899 a bitter and scarring war began between Britain and the two Boer republics of the Transvaal and Orange Free State. The causes of the war were primarily economic, as Britain eyed the riches of the Transvaal gold mines.

Britain at first used conventional military tactics, unsuited to the terrain of the Transvaal and the Orange Free State and the highly mobile Boer guerrilla forces. Disease casualties added heavily to battle losses.

The British adopted the bitterly resented ‘scorched earth’ policy and also interned civilians in concentration camps. The two Boer republics were forced to accept defeat in 1902, losing their independence. They became British colonies with a promise of limited self-government and in 1910 were incorporated in the new Union of South Africa.

Gold-and-Diamond-Mining

Gold and Diamond Mining

South Africa’s mining industry was established in 1867, on discovery of a diamond on the banks of the Orange River. When the diamond-bearing Kimberlite pipes were discovered, the first great rush of prospectors began.

This intensified when gold was found at Pilgrim’s Rest and Barberton and came to its peak when the rich gold reef at Langlaagte was discovered, sparking the growth of the Witwatersrand Goldfields.

South Africa remains a leading gold producer and is the world’s richest source of numerous other minerals such as platinum, chrome and manganese. It is also a leading supplier of many others including zirconium and coal. The diamond industry remains of importance.

Apartheid

Apartheid

Racial discrimination had roots in colonial times and became entrenched under successive governments. With the election of 1948 the National Party came to power and set about implementing its policy of ‘separate development’ *by extending existing racial segregation, making it more comprehensive and applying it more rigorously. Draconian legislation was introduced and at its height, Apartheid enforced discrimination in almost every aspect of life for the Black majority (Black, Coloured and Asian people).

All residential areas, schools, hospitals, public transport, beaches and parks, daily activities and social interaction, were segregated and vastly inferior public services were provided for Black people. They were deprived of theircitizenship, legally becoming citizens of one of ten tribally based self-governing homelands called Bantustans; they were not allowed to own land in White areas.

The iniquitous programme of Forced Removals brought misery to millions. Apartheid officially ended with the democratic election of 1994 and the advent of a democratic order in South Africa.

Nelson-Mandela

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela

Nelson Mandela, one of the world’s most loved and famous individuals, was born into the Madiba clan of the Tembu in Transkei on the 18th July 1918. He was a qualified lawyer, anti-apartheid activist and became the leader of the ANC’s armed wing. At the Rivonia trial in 1964 he was found guilty of sabotage and spent 27 years in prison, mostly on Robben Island.

National and international pressure led to his release on the 11th February 1990. Mandela went on to lead the ANC into negotiations and a peaceful settlement which ensured the ending of apartheid, the establishment of a democratic government, and the elections of 1994. In 1993 Mandela and F.W.de Klerk, the State President at the time, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Mandela was thereafter elected as South Africa’s first black President in 1994, a post which he held for one term, until 1999.

This celebrated political leader, known by his clan name ‘Madiba’, became a worldwide icon of reconciliation and goodwill. He passed away at his home in Johannesburg on the 5th December 2013 at the age of 95.

Truth-and-Reconciliation

Truth and Reconciliation

Achieving truth and reconciliation in the wake of the painful apartheid years was regarded as a priority after the 1994 democratic elections.

A commission, headed by Archbishop and Nobel Peace Prize winner Desmond Tutu, was set up by Nelson Mandela to bring to light wrongdoing by governmental and non-governmental institutions and individuals which caused gross violations of human rights. It sought to help resolve the pain, injustice and conflict of the past and to grant amnesty to those who made full disclosures.

In comparison with similar commissions set up elsewhere, South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission is generally considered to have accomplished a level of healing and harmony and is regarded as a model by the international community.

House-of-PartimentHouses of Parliment

South Africa’s tumultuous history has lead to various forms of government. From 1910 to 1994 Parliament was elected mainly by South Africa’s white minority. Notable changes began with the Tricameral Parliament in 1984. This changed when, following four years of negotiations, the 1993 Interim Constitution was adopted.

After the 1994 election the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa was developed and approved by the Constitutional Court on 4 December 1996. It took effect on 4th February 1997.

The Constitution is the supreme law of the land and South Africa’s constitution is highly regarded internationally.

Capital-CitiesSouth African Capital Cities

The Republic of South Africa is the southernmost independent national state on the African Continent. It is divided into nine provinces with 2,798km of coast line with the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meeting at its tip, slightly west of Cape Agulhas.

South Africa has three capital cities. Cape Town, known as the Mother City, is the Legislative capital and the seat of Parliament. Pretoria, known as Jacaranda City is the Executive and Administrative capital and the seat of the President and Cabinet. Bloemfontein, the City of Roses is the Judicial capital and the seat of the Supreme Court of Appeal.

Johannesburg, the City of Gold, is by far the largest city in the Republic. Whilst it is not one of South Africa’s capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court that has the final word on the interpretation of South Africa’s Post- Apartheid Constitution.

The-Big-FiveThe Big Five

The phrase Big Five was coined by the Big Game Hunters of the early 19th century and refers to the five most difficult African animals to hunt and the degree of danger involved, rather than their size.

The Lion, a majestic animal, is a symbol of power, courage and nobility. The Leopard is the most difficult to see as they have nocturnal feeding habits and a secretive nature. It is the strongest of the large cats and is capable of dragging prey heavier than itself high up into a tree. The African Elephant is the largest land mammal on Earth, but despite their large size can be difficult to sight in the African bush. There are two species of Rhinoceros in Africa. The Black Rhino are browsers, using their pointed upper lips like a miniature elephant trunk to twist branches off trees and shrubs. The White Rhino has a wide mouth and mainly eats grass; they are the more abundant of the two. The African Buffalo is considered the most dangerous of the Big Five, with woundeThe phrase Big Five was coined by the Big Game Hunters of the early 19th century and refers to the five most difficult African animals to hunt and the degree of danger involved,rather than their size.

Table-MountainTable Mountain

This is one of South Africa’s iconic landmarks. The highest point on Table Mountain is 1,086 metres (3,563 ft) above sea level, located towards the eastern end of the plateau and marked by Maclear’s Beacon; a stone built in 1865 by Sir Thomas Maclear. It is, for early pioneers and many subsequent visitors to South Africa their first view of the country. This magnificent backdrop to Cape Town is home to the outstanding local indigenous flora known as the Cape Fynbos Kingdom. It is a World Heritage Site and an estimated 2,200 species of plants are confined to Table Mountain – more than exist in the whole of the United Kingdom.

Table Mountain is popular with walkers as well as serious climbers though most visitors choose to reach the summit with its breathtaking view by cable car. This great engineering success officially opened in 1929. It is operated, maintained and regularly modernized by the Table Mountain Arial Cable Car Company and to date over 20 million people have experienced this spectacular trip.

The-SpringbokThe Springbok

The Springbok is South Africa’s national animal. It is a medium sized antelope that stands about 70 to 87 cm high, mostly russet brown with a white underside, the colours separated by a distinctive brown belt. Springbok males weigh between 33 to 50 kg and the females between to 25 to 40 kg. They can reach running speeds of up to 90 km/h, can leap 3,50 m and can long jump up to 15 m.

The country’s national rugby team is called the Springboks, a name that lost its adverse political connotations when Nelson Mandela proudly wore the Green and Gold Jersey in his careful building of South African unity.

ProteaThe Protea

The giant or King Protea is the largest of all the proteas and is South Africa’s national flower. The Protea genus contains a variety of different species and was named after the Greek god Proteus who could change shape at will.

It is widely distributed in the southwestern and southern parts of South Africa in the fynbos region. Proteas are a beautiful component of the Cape Fynbos, the smallest but most diverse biome of the world’s six floral kingdoms. The unique Cape Floral Kingdom has Unesco Natural Heritage status because of its biodiversity. Proteas are known as Suikerbossies (sugar bushes) as their nectar attracts birds.

The King Protea is the emblem of South Africa’s national cricket team.

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